The Bull-Horned Fortress

In the Age of Dragons you were a dragon and when you battled against your rival and were killed I built your fortress from your dragon bones. Crowned it with the horns from your dragon brow, the jewel in your forehead, light of the North.

In the Age of Giants you were a giant and when you battled against your rival and were killed I built your fortress from your giant bones. Crowned it with the horns from your horned helmet, your faces four looking out, rotating, turning. 

In the Age of Bulls you were a bull and when you battled against your rival and were killed I built your fortress from your aurochs bones. Crowned it with your mighty horns, the hooves of your many feet took it north, stampeding, snorting.

In the Age of Men you were a man and when you battled against your rival and were killed I built your fortress, as men do, from stone, from glass, from stories. I gathered your bones, laid you within, crowned it with your horned helmet.

Thus endures the story of your Fortress of Wonders and your sleep until Winter.

This prose piece and image were created following a meditation on Gwyn’s death and departure on Calan Mai. For many years I have experienced visions of his Bull-Horned Fortress and this morning I had a profound sense of it enduring through a series of mythic ages and myself being present throughout to tend his death and build his fortress.

4 thoughts on “The Bull-Horned Fortress

  1. Thornsilver says:

    This is beautiful and profound. Thank you for sharing that vision and the poem. I like the idea of building a fortress not only from “mundane” materials but also stories, and that being a particularly human thing to do.

    I’ve been thinking about my experiences with Gwyn’s bull aspect lately. I don’t talk about it much because there’s not a lot that would make sense to say in public, but it’s definitely there. My recent initiation journey has led me to investigate Minoan Paganism–it seems that bulls were also important in that culture. While I’m told they have a very different meaning than in Celtic myths, I can’t help but connect “the divine white bull from the sea, whom the Queen fell hopelessly in love with” (from the Minotaur myth) to Gwyn and my devotion to Him. It also gives another interesting layer to “the labyrinth connection” (I guess it’s not just limited to Jareth and his odd similarity to a certain Faery King!).

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