Co(r)vid Moon – A Poetry Pamphlet for my Patrons

On the last dark moon, as England entered another national lockdown, I prayed to Gwyn for advice on what to make my focus over the approaching moon cycle. I received his answers through divination, a journey, and free writing, and the next morning, on the new moon, I was given the theme ‘Co(r)vid Moon’.

So, I decided to commit to writing 28 poems, one for each day of the moon cycle, relating to corvids and/or covid. Some days I wrote 2 – 4 and on others I didn’t write any at all, but I met my target. Of them 19 are shareable and I have put them together as a poetry pamphlet exclusively for my patrons as an expression of my gratitude for their invaluable support through the COVID-19 pandemic.

In these poems I explore my relationship with Gwyn as a gatherer of souls who guides the dead with ‘ravens who croak over gore’ and their role in this plague. I also dive into immunology and cell biology.

If you enjoy my work and would like a copy of the pamphlet please consider becoming a patron through Patreon HERE. There will be other gifts along with regular rewards such as a monthly newsletter, crazy things, access to unseen work, and your name in my future print publications and free signed books on higher tiers.

Here is a selection of the poems:

The Summoning of the Ravens

It is not we who summon but the ravens.

You will know it by the moment the sky goes out
to the cronk of their calls like the blinking of a god’s eyelid.

Do not ignore the momentary shadow of their four-fingered wings.

The casting of doubt on everything is only the beginning.

I have seen ravens on Dumbarton Rock, the Great Orme,
Pen Dinas, but never expected to see them here
in Peneverdant shuddering out the skies.

“Who” and “what’”and “why?” I cry
in this wilderness of lockdown, try to interpret
their unconquerable calls and their potent messages.

Every time I find words the ravens shift further out of sight.


A Raven has a Job Interview

“Tell me, raven, what qualities make you a good candidate for this role?”

“My great black wings, the sharpness of my beak, my love of flying between worlds.
My legendary wit and cleverness. My ability to find shiny and unshiny things.
My incredible memory and the comforting and uncomforting sounds of my words.
The unfathomable darkness, greatness, ultimately the kindness of my heart.”

“Can you give me examples of when you have worked alone and in a team?”

“Alone I fly, ever onwards, dark eyes swivelling like planets in their orbits,
searching for the corpses of the dead but, alone, I cannot open them, peck them apart,
so I call to the wolves and they come howling with their stronger muzzles to lay open
the wet flesh, the steaming jewels of the innards, and I call my sisters to feast.”

“And, finally, can you tell me what rewards you expect to get out of the job?”

“Well I would be lying if I didn’t admit it was the eyes – the colours of the irises,
the beautiful fragility of their dying light, their exquisite taste, the softness of corpses.
The magic in the moment a soul flies free. The prestige of flying with Gwyn ap Nudd.
Yet, in all honesty, what drew me to this job was the promise of immortality.”


A Raven Carries

the full moon in her beak

or is it a white blood cell – a stolen piece of me?

I see the sky is filled with ravens carrying little moons,
carrying pieces of me away and there are billions of them
because the body produces 10 billion white blood cells a day.

The sky is white with moons and black with raven’s wings.

I wonder if I am alive or dead or somewhere in between.

Are there islands of the dead for dead leukocytes
or do they long instead for another body and plasma?

Will they head for my co-walker and her horse and hounds
and settle like expected guests into her ectoplasm

or wing away to some otherworldly graveyard
where upon each stone is a small engraving
in a language only cells can speak?

5 thoughts on “Co(r)vid Moon – A Poetry Pamphlet for my Patrons

  1. Tiege McCian says:

    I think ‘The Raven Carries’ is the most enjoyable poem I’ve read from you yet! The comparison between moons and white blood cells is ingenious. The ravens as agents of destruction is of course a classic motif, but presenting them metaphors for disease is inventive and clever. I enjoy the whole middle section, but here’s my absolute favorite line, for the highflying starkness of it all as a representative image of the writer’s anxiety:

    The sky is white with moons and black with raven’s wings.

    Amazing work with that poem!

    • Tiege McCian says:

      Ack, I also forgot to mention that it’s an amazing coincidence to read these poems about ravens from you! I just finished reading the Life of Saint Padarn and in it there is a very curious story. A pair of men try to cheat Padarn, and he demands a trial by ordeal by dipping his hands into boiling water. Padarn is obviously unharmed, but the would-be thieves are “all burnt, they and their lives, and their souls fled in the form of ravens”. I’ve never seen this said so explicitly before from a Brythonic/Breton source, but disembodied souls as birds appear a lot in Old Irish texts, The Vision of Adamnán being a good example. I’m so happy to see that it was a tradition in Wales as well! It occurs often enough in Irish that it’s generally believed to be a remnant of Celtic paganism. It also added another breathtaking layer to your work.

      So yeah, that’s all, great happenstance!

      • lornasmithers says:

        Oh that’s interesting. I hadn’t come across the thieves in the Life Saint Padarn turning into ravens. I’ve generally found saints’ lives to be excruciating to get through but sometimes worth it to find such gems. I think Arthur was reputed to have turned into a raven in Cornish folklore so lots of these transformations about!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.