Castle Hill

Castle Hill, motteSegregated by the howling by-pass and enclosed within a shroud of trees Castle Hill is a well kept secret unknown to most of Penwortham’s residents. Yet this hidden headland puts the ‘pen’ in Penwortham, or Peneverdant- ‘the green hill on the water’. It is the place where the history of the township began.

Occupation of the area dates to the Neolithic Period. The construction of Preston Docks in the late nineteenth century unearthed a collection of human skulls dating from 4000BC to 800BC, the bones of auroch and red deer, a bronze age spearhead, remnants of a brushwood platform and pair of dug out canoes indicating the existence of a dwelling akin to Glastonbury Lake Village inhabited by the Setantii tribe. Following from the notion that churches are built on pagan sacred sites it is possible St Mary’s church (which is on the summit) replaced a burial mound and / or stone circle.

The sacred nature of the hill is shown by three recorded holy wells. The best known is St Mary’s Well, which was located at the hill’s foot. It was attributed healing properties and was an important sight of pilgrimage. Since drying up its has sadly been covered over by the by-pass. This well was of such importance local people walked a mile to fetch water from it, following the pilgrim’s path. St Anne’s well was located to the west of the church. A well within the church was recently discovered to contain a body inhumed with three skulls which might serve an apotraic function.

A ballista ball and nearby industrial site supplemented by the tale of a ghostly troupe of centurions suggest Roman occupation. The castle mound and its twin at Tulketh were built by Saxons to hold off the Vikings who buried the infamous Cuerdale Horde. When the Normans invaded they rebuilt the castle and Peneverdant served as administrative centre to the Barony of Bussel. The hill was also the site of Penwortham Priory and residence of some scurrilous monks.

Since then St Mary’s church has governed the parish. Whilst the earliest known grave is of a 12th C crusader, the graveyard has served as a burial place for Penwortham’s people since the sixteenth century. The war memorial on the south bank resonates deeply with its association with ancestral remembrance.

One of its darkest legends concerns a fairy funeral. Two men returning home come upon a procession of little men clad in black, wearing red caps and bearing a coffin. One of them dares to look within and sees his miniature doppelganger dead and cold. When the fairies begin the burial he tries to stop it by grasping their leader and the party vanishes. Driven mad by the experience he topples from a haystack to his untimely end.

The path running through Church Wood beside the hill is known as Fairy Lane. In spring it is covered by bluebells and ransoms. In summer the blackbird song never ends. In autumn winds crash, leaves fall and the by-pass roars. Through winter’s depth ivy keeps the wood alive, the leaning yew holds vigil and for a blessed moment there is silence.

Every visit to this magical place, standing between humanity and nature, the dead and the living reminds me of those unseen bonds which might otherwise remain unacknowledged as the old green hill.

* First published in The Druid Network Newsletter (Samhain 2013)

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7 thoughts on “Castle Hill

  1. Wow what an interesting story, though i may have read it before at the place it was published last year. What strikes me is that the church, dedicated to Mary, a female goddess was build at the base of the hill by the holy wells. I assume most churches would be built On the hill, especially those to Christian gods like St Michael. And of course Romans or any troops would man the hilltop for surveillance and defensive purposes. Thank you as i am going to reblog this one. Beautiful picture of the old gravestones and the shadows of the trees on the mound. BB

    1. The church is on top of the hill… ooops… I’ve noticed that I haven’t stated this clearly and the lines ‘The sacred nature of the hill is shown by three recorded holy wells. The best known is St Mary’s which was located at the hill’s foot’ might lead the reader to thinking the church is there too. Will ammend paragraph 2 to say ‘it is possible St Mary’s (which is on the hill’s summit) replaced a burial mound and / or stone circle. Thanks for spotting this!

  2. Reblogged this on Blau Stern Schwarz Schlonge and commented:
    Here’s a great historical post by Lorna at the From Peneverdant blog. My comment was: “Wow what an interesting story, though i may have read it before at the place it was published last year. What strikes me is that the church, dedicated to Mary, a female goddess was build at the base of the hill by the holy wells. I assume most churches would be built On the hill, especially those to Christian gods like St Michael. And of course Romans or any troops would man the hilltop for surveillance and defensive purposes. Thank you as i am going to reblog this one. Beautiful picture of the old gravestones and the shadows of the trees on the mound. BB”

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